The Co-operative Innovation Project

Collaborative, Community-Led Solutions

Community Reports

As part of the Co-operative Innovation Project, we co-hosted meetings with community leaders in 26 rural, First Nations and Métis communities across western Canada, from southern Manitoba to northern British Columbia. Each of these meetings had regional appeal: in all, fifty rural and thirteen First Nations and Métis communities were invited — and in some cases, more came.

These events sparked community-level conversations: what do we need, here in this place, in order to have a better life?

Each community is receiving an individualized report that combines information from both community visits and statistical data related to rural and Aboriginal communities in western Canada, broken down by community type, by province, and down to the community level.

These reports aim to help communities do three things:

  • one, learn what is the state of rural, First Nations, and Métis communities across western Canada, in 2015;
  • two, see where and how their needs are similar to or different from other rural, First Nations, and Métis communities across western Canada;
  • and three, learn what each community had to say about local needs, as a way to inspire local solutions that fit.

We send our deepest thanks to the many people who came out to the community events. They graciously shared their thoughts, their frustrations, their community pride, and their hopes with the Co-operative Innovation Project.

Community Reports:

Arborfield    Bow_Island    Buffalo_Lake    Buffalo_Narrows    Clinton    Cross_Lake    Dauphin    Fruitvale    Gillam    Gitanyow    Gitsegukla    High_Level    Humboldt    Laird    Maidstone    Masset    New_Denver    New_Hazelton    One_Arrow    Pinawa    Rimbey    Smoky_Lake    Sundre    Warfield    Whitefish_Lake    Yellowgrass

If you are interested in reading more, see the chapter on Community Needs and the chapter on Community Capacity as part of our Final Report.

Also: check out the results from the Telephone Survey of ordinary people living in rural and Aboriginal communities in western Canada, and the Web-based Survey of municipal and band administrators. We also compared those two surveys, to see where they were the same, and where they differed.

Finally, we split out rural and Aboriginal communities across western Canada, by community type, and by province, to look a little deeper into how they were similar, and where they differed. Find those thoughts, By the Numbers.

 

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